Autism, Disability and the Church

do-not-be-afraid.jpgI have two sons with autism, and our experiences of church life have not always been straight-forward or even supportive. Inclusion for people with disabilities within the church is an issue that isn’t talked about as often as it should, and that silence leaves many families and individuals feeling like they’re on the outskirts of the faith, outsiders in the Kingdom of God. This should not be the case.

Because of this, I’ve written a number of posts on disability and the church, mainly from the perspective of a parent, and I’ve made an attempt to catalogue them all here.

Some posts outline what it’s like to go to church when your children have autism, the positives and the challenges; often, at it’s worst, it can feel like we’re in exile. That’s why it’s so important for carers to try and observe a Sabbath rest, and to try not to be afraid; that last one applies equally to the wider congregation, who need to recognise and celebrate the gifts of those with disabilities in our churches, and who need to look at ways in which we need to rediscover Pentecost when looking at inclusion. Hopefully then we can move from awareness, to acceptance, and finally through to appreciation. Always remember that the great banquet of God has wheelchair access, and that there are times when the church needs to be a prophetic voice.

Meanwhile, other posts aimed to put things into a wider context, both positive – like this post for Ability Sunday 2016 – or in trying to raise awareness of an increased level of violence aimed at people with disabilities, as shown through the horrific events in Sagamihara, and the way in which mockery seems to be becoming more ‘acceptable’, sadly.

Other posts touch on how these sort of issues are tackled within the Bible itself: in how Jesus makes sure blind Bartimaeus is given the dignity of using his own voice, for instance, or how Jesus clearing the Temple had a direct impact on people with disabilities. And, perhaps most importantly, there’s an Old Testament law that states we should never put stumbling blocks in the way of those with disabilities; that’s a lesson our churches need to rediscover before they can truly be called inclusive. We also need to get better at looking after our church toilets.

The blog also includes a few posts on mental illness: about how Elijah finds himself in what sounds like a depressive state at the top of Mount Horeb, about how art can be healing, about how the church needs to get better at talking about mental health, and about how, sometimes, the greatest ministry we have is simply the sacred ministry of giving a damn.

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