Disability and the Church: Prophesy in a Dangerous Time

The United Nations has recently released a report stating that welfare reforms in the UK have led to “grave and systematic violations” of the rights of disabled people. Along with the implementation of the reforms, one of the areas the report criticises is the portrayal of people with disabilities as lazy, scroungers, burdens on society. And that portrayal is the most insidious, because it allows all the other violations of rights to be rubber-stamped by those who buy into the negative depiction of, say, someone with ‘invisible’ disabilities, or who doesn’t need to use a wheelchair 24/7 (and who therefore gets criticised for walking when they can).

All of this is horrifying, and while some may quibble with the wording or the findings, research has found that attacks on disabled people are increasing, and while some of that may be down to increased reporting, it’s sobering to note that in the same period, violent crime in general has actually reduced.

All of which makes me worry about the future for my kids.

Now, I’ve posted here before about the need for the church to better engage those with disabilities. Inclusion is something that every church thinks it does well, but in reality there are a lot of things we can do better, a lot of things that need to change – buildings, yes, but also language, structures, attitudes… So many people feel exiled from the wider church community, so many people struggle to find acceptance within a congregation, so many have to fight every step of the way to be treated as an equal, for their kids to be respected like everyone else.

I’ve argued here before how the church needs to get past this, to recognise the Image of God in everyone and to make our sacred spaces more accessible and inclusive. All of this remains true.

But at the same time churches are meant to be outposts of the Kingdom of God. And they’re supposed to reflect the heart of Christ for those around them. And in a society where some of the most vulnerable are being treated terribly, where people are being scapegoated by the media and opportunistic politicians, the church has to decide whose side it’s on. In a sense it faces similar temptations to Jesus in the wilderness – keep quiet and bow the knee for earthly power, or take a stand. And that might be costly. We might offend some people who give generously when the collection plate comes round. We might have to divert some of our church budgets away from cosmetic enhancements in order to make sure we’re accessible to all. But people are becoming the victim of hate crimes, they’re being crushed in the gears of our political systems, and we can’t ignore that without fatally compromising who we’re meant to be.

The church needs to reclaim its prophetic voice. We need to speak the words of the God who has a heart for the poor and the marginalised. And some of that will mean challenging the entrenched views of some members of our congregations, and putting our own house in order first, but at the same time we need to show some leadership here. Because the world has the potential to go into some dark places here – we’re already on the way – and if we’re going to be the light of the world then we need to flick the lightswitch. Salt’s no good if it’s lost its saltiness, just something else to be walked all over.

We live in interesting times. We live in dangerous times. And those are the times at which the rubber needs to meet the road; those are the times we need to unleash the prophets and fling open the gates and declare that we’re not going to look like the world around us, instead we’re going to look, however imperfectly, like Jesus.

He’s waiting for us to join him.

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